An unnamed woman — described as a professional choreographer, dancer, model and musical artist— is accusing Chris Brown of drugging and raping her on a yacht parked by Diddy’s Star Island mansion. She says the singer had invited her to Diddy’s house after seeing her on a FaceTime call with a friend. When she arrived, she says Chris Brown have a her a drink, after which she started to lose consciousness.

According to the woman, Chris Brown took her to a room on the yacht, shut the door, and raped her. She also claims that he ejaculated in her and texted her to take Plan B the next day, which she did.

According to TMZ, the incident took place on December 30, 2020. The accuser’s lawyers, #ArielMitchell and #GeorgeVrabeck, say their client did not report the alleged rape to cops at the time because she was a medical student and was embarrassed.

The woman is suing Chris Brown for $20 million in damages. The singer has since responded to the headline, calling it a “pattern of cap.”

Tomorrow, the self-titled documentary on Janet Jackson’s life — which also marks the 40th anniversary of her self-titled debut album — premieres on Lifetime and A&E. In anticipation and celebration of this event, it is only right that we take a look back at one of Janet’s greatest hits.

In January of 1987, Janet released “Let’s Wait Awhile” as the fifth single from her third (and breakthrough) album, Control. The song was co-written by Ms. Jackson, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, and Melanie Andrews, who was Janet’s best friend at the time. It was inspired by Melanie’s real-life apprehension about giving up the cookies to her then-boyfriend.

Though a beautifully written song, “Let’s Wait Awhile” is one of the more blatant examples of plagiarism you will find. The song lifts the melody and piano line from America’s “Daisy Jane”, but luckily, Janet & co. settled out-of-court with Gerry Beckley (who wrote “Daisy Jane”) early.

“Let’s Wait Awhile” offered a welcomed alternative in an industry that isn’t known for being chaste. Also, abstinence theme was particularly popular at a time where every one was freaking out about AIDS, which had been discovered just five years prior.

“Let’s Wait Awhile” would become Janet Jackson’s fifth top five single on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 2.



This past Monday, Cardi B  won her libel lawsuit against gossip blogger Tasha Kebe — better known as Tasha K. The blogger was sued in 2019 after she reported that the rapper was a former prostitute who had contracted STDs.

Cardi has been awarded $1 million in general damages, $250,000 for medical expenses, $1.5 million in punitive damages, and $1.3 million in legal fees, bringing the total sum to roughly $4.1 million.

Tasha K has since posted a 12-minute video statement explaining that the verdict against her came as “no shock“ and that she wouldn’t change anything about it, but “intends to fight until the truth is out.”

Today marks 10 years since the passing of Etta James, so it is only right that we honor her legacy but this weeks TBT post.

In November 1960, James released a cover of “At Last,” a song originally recorded by Glenn Miller for the 1941 music Sun Valley Serenade. It was the third single from At Last!, which was the singer’s first LP.

Peaking at No. 47 on the Billboard Hot 100, “At Last” wasn’t a major chart hit, but it has a longer legacy than most No. 1s. Etta James’ version of the song is quite literally THE version of the song, and when people cover it, it is her version they emulate.

Below is a live performance of the song at Etta James’ induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

In a tearful video posted to her Instagram page, Adele just announced that her Vegas residency will be postponed because the show isn’t quite ready. She’s blaming the postponement on production delays and COVID infections on her team.

The 24-show residency — titled Weekends with Adele — was just days away from its debut and was supposed to run till April. There is currently no word on when it will be rescheduled.

In September of 1979, British duo The Buggles released their debut single, “Video Killed the Radio Star.” The song was written by the two members of the group, Trevor Horn and Geoffrey Downes, and Bruce Woolley, who was actually a member of the group at the time but would end up forming another group, Bruce Woolley and the Camera Club, before The Buggles released any music. The composition of “Video” Killed the Radio Star” was based on a chorus riff Woolley came up with, and he would go on to record another version of the song with his new group.

“Video Killed the Radio Star” is a quirky yet poignant observation of technology and its impact on popular music. It’s not clear how literal the title was supposed to be, but it definitely foretold what the industry would eventually look like. Music videos were quickly becoming standard practice, and by 1981, there would be a TV station called MTV that played nothing but music videos. Fittingly, the very first video played on the network was the one for “Video Killed the Radio Star.”

Despite its iconic status today, “Video Killed the Radio Star” barely cracked the top 40 in the US. Elsewhere, it was a major hit, topping the chart in the UK, Spain, and over a dozen other countries.

In July of 1998, Tatyana Ali released “Daydreamin'” as the lead single from her debut (and only) album, Kiss the Sky. Produced by Darkchild and based on a Steely Dan sample, the song features an uncredited Lord Tariq & Peter Gunz, who had used that very same sample on a song released seven months prior.

Tatyana Ali reportedly got into music after Will Smith convinced her to — the two had co-starred on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, where she had showcased her singing chops on a cover of Aretha Franklin’s “Respect.” She would go on to land a record deal with Michael Jackson’s MJJ Music, which was distributed by Epic Records.

Within months of the release of “Daydreamin’,” Tatyana Ali enrolled at Harvard University. Her career in entertainment would take a backseat, and she would only promote her music on the weekends. “Daydreamin'” would become her one and only song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 6.

Novak Djokovic — the current No. 1 male tennis player in the world, highest-earning tennis player of all time, and current Australian Open champion — will not be able to defend his title because he has been denied entry into Australia. Because he’s unvaccinated.

It was all good just yesterday, when the Serbian claimed to have been granted an exemption, but apparently, somebody lied to him. Australia’s prime minister, Scott Morrison, has since released a statement on the matter.